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Ford 2011 Super Duty First Drive Towing Trailers

2011 Super Duty, Fuel Efficient Fords are Back

The only US truck manufacture to make their own diesel engine

Ford 2011 Super Duty first drive towing trailers; finally a Ford diesel that gets over 20 mpg, no diesel engine price increase, all new 6-speed automatic, standard exhaust brake and telescoping steering wheel, oh my!  You may think this is Ford’s first diesel, in a truck in the USA, you’re right. But Ford has diesels around the world. My New Holland swather in the eighties had a Ford industrial diesel, and Ford tractors had diesels built in England. Building the diesel engine and new 6-speed transmission in-house, is part of the answer to holding price. Most semi diesel trucks, meeting the new emission standards implemented in January have gone up thousands of dollars using DEF (urea.) So far Ford and Dodge have not increased the diesel engine option cost, GM will be are pressed to hold their diesel price when they introduce their 2011 HD truck latter this spring.

Ford’s Super Duty is now a Severe Duty. Farmers are the biggest users and abusers of pickup trucks. My first 32 years were on a farm in Eastern Colorado. I loaded 3000 lbs in my ½ tons, 5000 lbs in ¾ tons and 10k lbs in my one ton dually. Trucks have to pay there way on the farm just like your tractor and combine. Turbo lag is gone, we’ve been promised this before, and now smooth acceleration all the way to redline. That’s the over all theme with the new Fords, smo-ooooth. Smooth shifting, no turbo lag, no jerk from the new exhaust brake, less jerk from grade shifting, it’s as close to a car feel as I’ve ever felt in a heavy duty truck.

Seven percent grades, like we used to in Colorado, provided a good test in Arizona towing trailers. Ideal towing truck with power telescoping and folding mirrors, telescoping steering wheel and power adjust pedals. Now that you’re comfortable, launch with a 24,000 lb triple axle trailer is smooth and quiet. Reminds me of a hydrostatic combine, just push the pedal and it goes. You won’t notice much when it shifts gears unless you’re focused on the dash gauges. The new live all the time PTO will let you run a sprayer, snow plow, dump bed etc. on the go, it will make a great feed truck.

 New Engines and 6-Speed Automatic Transmission Only

The big news is fuel mileage. The outgoing 6.4L Power Stroke diesel was last place in the MPG race and the all new 6.7L may very well be the new fuel mileage leader. 18 %  improvement for the diesel engine and 15% better mpg for the new 6.2L gas engine over the two engines it replaces. Driving a few hundred miles in Arizona from 4500 ft to 1500 ft with a 1000 lb payload onboard, the diesels I drove showed 20 to 23 mpg on the Ford info center screen. I’ll get the 2011 Ford Super Duty trucks later, longer for review and will test tank to tank for real life fuel mileage. The MPG improvement comes by optimizing combustion and cooling with a Ford built diesel and 6-speed automatic.

The all new 6.7L Power Stroke diesel is reverse flow with the exhaust manifold in the valley below the dual compressor wheel turbo and the intake runners going above the turbo and back into the aluminum heads to flow to the outside of the heads. Two EGR coolers, two complete cooling systems and pumps called high temp and low temp cooling system on diesel. The gas models have just high temp cooling system. Each EGR cooler is cooled separately which was a trouble spot on the last two diesels. Transmission, steering, intercooler and even engine cooling circulates thru the new separate radiators. Looking under the hood exposes the large radiator running up above the grill. Though it looks like a plumbers nightmare under hood, Ford claims engine service is simpler with less need to pull the cab for surgery.

The extra power allows higher axle ratio’s similar to what semi truck have done for better fuel mileage. The engine can even lug down to 900 RPM and have the transmissions torque converter still locked. Another part of the MPG equation is the torque converter will lock up sooner and stay locked up longer in Tow Mode, acting like a manual transmission. With 4 transmission modes, normal, tow, progressive and manual, you can let the truck do the work, shift yourself or control in progressive mode what the highest gear will be. In tow haul mode, you can downshift by tapping on the brake all the way from 6 to 1 as the RPM’s will allow. The lower torque peak power RPM of 1600 and double overdrive, letting the diesel engine run slower. Of course that helps quiet the engine. A new damper in the torque converter allows lower speed without shutter down to 950 rpm.

The all-new Ford-engineered, Ford-designed, Ford-built 6.7-liter Power Stroke® V-8 turbocharged diesel engine has torque of  735 ft.-lb. (at 1,600 rpm) and 390 horsepower (at 2,800 rpm)  85 ft.-lb. and 40 horsepower more than the 6.4L. The new engine is B20 biodiesel compatible. The new dual spark plug 6.2-liter V-8 gasoline engine delivers 405 ft.-lb. of torque (at 4,500 rpm) and 385 horsepower (at 5,500 rpm) on regular gasoline is  E85 compatible.  These numbers represent an increase of 40 ft.-lb. of torque and 85 horsepower over the current 5.4-liter V-8. The 6.2L is overhead cam, large bore short stroke design. Ninety percent of the 6.2L gas engine is available at 2,000 rpm.

F450 Pickup, More Towing, Less Payload, More Speed

When Ford introduced the F450 pickup truck in 2008, it was the truck that could do it all. But fuel mileage was similar to a fire truck. So Ford replaced the 12 ply 19.5 inch tires with 17 inch 10 ply tires, went from 10 lug to 8 lug and increased the towing capacity by 200 lbs from 24,200 to 24,400 lbs. The GVWR went down from 14,500 lbs to 13,050 lbs, but the Gross Combined Weight Rating is still 33,000 lbs. The lower curb weight from lighter tires and wheels allowed the extra trailer capacity. The F450 pickup only comes in 4×4 crew cab long bed. It comes standard with the new factory gooseneck/5th wheel prep package and a 4.30 axle ratio. The DRW Ford F350 diesel only comes with a 3.73 axle ratio. The F250 diesel has a 3.55 standard ratio with 3.31 ratio option. The top speed on previous F450 pickup trucks was limited by the tires limit of 85 mph and now for 2011, the top speed can reach 95.

Towing

Ford again tops the towing field with the same trailer brake controller they introduced in 2005 (on the right side, pay attention Dodge and GM, ever see a semi-truck with the trailer brake control on the left side?) But this integrated factory brake controller can be adjusted in the dash display to work with electric over hydraulic trailer brakes and still will work with electric trailer brakes. For more torque and horsepower from the 6.7L Power Stroke, Ford added a larger ring and pinion in it’s Sterling rear differentials. DRW (dually) drive trains have larger U-Joints this model. New steering gears in all the SD’s and geometry on 4×2 trucks. 4×2’s have a new equal length parallel steering linkage for equal wheel movement. The steering does feel better, less effort needed, which helps with road trip fatigue. This should help with snow plows and all the parallel parking we do by the barn.

The lower first transmission gear, 3.97 gives you great trailer launch ability. You won’t miss the lower gears we’re use to. The new 6R140 automatic transmission can manually shift all 6 gears. Tow/haul mode holds engine RPMs higher than usual before upshifting to help keep the truck from getting bogged down when it’s towing, and it automatically downshifts the truck with a tap of the foot brake, as long as it won’t take the engine over the rpm redline. The out going transmission took more foot pressure to grade shift down a gear.

I drove an F-250 diesel Lariat Crew Cab 4×4 SRW with an 8-foot box and 3.55:1 rear axle. Towing 9,900 pounds up 7% grades isn’t much of a challenge for this configuration, which has a max conventional trailering capacity of 14,000 pounds and maximum fifth-wheel capacity of 15,700 pounds. We tested Hill Start Assist and it will hold the truck for a couple seconds while you go from brake to gas pedal.

Next I took a F450 pickup truck with 4.30 axle ratio up the hill with a triple axle 24,000 lb gooseneck. Now we’re talking, this is what I go through the drive up window at Starbuck with. Great control coming down the hill with the automatic exhaust brake in tow mode, grade shifting and locking the highest gear to 3rd with progressive shift mode. Turning tight corners produced a shutter from the M80 Dana True Trac differential.

Lastly I took the new 6.2L gas powered F250 up the hill. Ford uses the same transmission in gas and diesel, 6 gears, with a low 1st gear at 3.97 gets the gas engine going with a trailer from the start smoothly. Nice spread of gears, same for diesel, instead of just a double overdrive for improved fuel mileage, Super Duty with the 6.2L gas engine actually can utilize all six gears, even direct is spaced more than 1 to 1. SRW only axle ration is the 3.73. Not the ratio we’re used to for towing 10,000 lb trailers. On the grade Ford provided us with 9900 lb. conventional trailer, the 6.2 L howls pulling a trailer near red line 6000  rpm. Without a trailer, the 6.2L has as nice low torquey throttle sound, but under load, the engine is louder in the cab than the new diesel engine. The SRW trucks have Sterling rear differentials with E-Lock that you manually engage with the 4×4 switch.

Using the progressive shift option on the all new 6-speed 6R-140 automatic in tow mode, allows the driver to manage which gear holds the best RPM for proper torque range on the short stroke engine.  Not easy evaluating a gas engine right after a diesel. The all new 6.2L gasser feels stronger than 5.4L gas engine it replaces, with some of the performance improvement credited to the new 6-speed automatic transmissions gear spacing.  6.2L throttle response is good with a trailer, but you know it’s not the 6.8L V-10 gas engine that’s still available with DRW cab and chassis but only with last years 5-speed 5R110 automatic transmission.

In Arizona towing a 9900 lb trailer with 3.73 rear axle ratio, close to 4500 ft elevation and side wind, not fast off the line but acceptable acceleration for uphill towing. Only other choice with a gas engine, is to go with the 4.30 axle ratio only available with 22,000 lb Gross Combined Weight Rating for a SRW or DRW All Ford SD’s have Dana front axles. Super Duty inherited the independent trailer braking to control sway from little brother F150 along with electronic stability control for controlling an empty truck when roads are slick. Side air bags and side curtains are now standard. Car safety standards have caught up to trucks.

Prep package for the factory 5th wheel goose combination hitch is  $400 for 24000 lb trailer capacity. Because of the different EPA Dyno testing for trucks over 14,000 lb. GVWR, cab & chassis F450/550 diesel is  300 horsepower and 660 ft. lbs of torque.

Service and Clean Air

Back to a 2 quart spin on oil filter. This is less mess than the cartridge 1 quart filter Ford has used since 2003.  In the pan transmission filter good is for 150,000 miles of severe duty with a special dual media sump screen. The new Diesel Exhaust Fluid (urea) for the new 2010 lower federal emission standard Nox rating, is filled next to the diesel cap in the bigger fuel door. Super Duties hold 5.6 gallons, 6.3 on a Cab & Chassis model. The 4.2 LCD Productivity screen displays warnings when you need to add more DEF. Still dual fuel filters on the new diesel with a water drain on the primary fuel filter inside the drivers side frame. The engine oil drain plug is unique, no more taking the plug out or dropping it in the old oil, just insert a ratchet and a 1/4 turn on the plug.

1) Tread Act label among multiple things …defines the max. payload on the specific build vehicle.
If an OEM overstates their max. advertize-able payload it results in a recall.
This label is typically posted on the front door or b-pillar. Example is attached.
2) With respect to the F450 Pick-up our objective was to improve on key areas based on customer feedback:
> Vehicle Max speed limit of 81 mph (10 MY – limited by commercial rated 19.5″ tires)  vs. 95 mph (11 MY reduced GVWR which enabled the use 17″ tires
   eliminating the tire as a Vmax constraint)
> 11 MY Improved Fuel Economy 18% over 10 MY F450 P/U Auto 4×4
As we stated in the all media event, our ultimate towing vehicle is our 11 MY F450 Pick-up, which is offered in the following configuration:
>  F450 Pick-up 6.7L, Auto, 4×4, Crew Cab,  8 ft Box with comes with a standard factory-installed 5th wheel/goose prep package.
Trailer Tow Rating increased to 24 400 lbs (11MY) vs. 24 200 lbs (10MY)
> GVWR was reduced to 13 050 lbs, which, among other things enabled us to meet Diesel Chassis Certification Emissions ilo Dyno Certification Emission.
Diesel Chassis Certification can only be applied for GVWRs of 14 000 lbs or lower.
Our 6.7L Chassis Certified engine max. ratings are 390 Hp @ 2800 rpm, 735 lbs.ft @ 1600 rpm.
> Max. Payload for 11 MY F450 Pick-up is 4920 lbs
3) Factory-installed 5th Wheel/Gooseneck Trailer Tow Prep Package (standard on the F450 Pick-up):
Gooseneck centerline is 2.75″ forward of the centerline of the rear axle…see enclosed illustration.
4) All new Class Exclusive Live Drive PTO:..see photo below.
5) Rear Axle Ring Gear Size
> Single Rear Wheel Axle 10.75″
> M80 Dual Rear Wheel Axle 11.25″
> S110 Dual Rear Wheel Axle 12.25″

F350 DWR  Car safety standards have caught up to trucks.

  No diesel price increase, news flash, inside engine saves money.

Telescoping steering wheel. hydro boost steering on DRW, vacum on SWR

Trailer screen saves info on different trailers, can switch between electric brakes or electric over hydraulic. Aluminum fins on SD diff

With the F250 diesel’s lowest axle ratio a 3.55, those of use that tow heavy trailers are use to 4.10 and 4.30 ratio’s. But if you look at the trend in semi tractor trucks that have a GCWR of 85k lbs, you see mostly 3.55 final drives.

Glad to see the same trany in gas and diesel, 6 gears, lower 1st in 3.97. Nice spread of gears, instead of just double od, even direct is spaced more, so actually using all six gears instead of two ods just for better mpg.3.73 with E locker, progressive shift helps with a trailer, lock out od. howls pulling a trailer near 6000  rpm. Not easy evaluating a gas engine right after flying up the hill with a diesel. hill start assist uses abs and helps, throttle response is good. with trailer gas is loader than diesel. 525rpm idle

9000 lb trailer with 3.73 guessing 4500 ft side wind, not fast off the line. have to go DRW to get the 4.30 axle tow mode and this tranny make it easy on this engine.

Balanced steering, DEF 5.6 gallons, last two oil changes. first gas truck engine to squirt oil on piston skirts. Regen half as often.

  2+1 3+1 4+1 5+1 9 +1 11+1  DRW have larger U-Joints Dana1410 to 1480 DRW have weird diff

We drove an F-250 Lariat Crew Cab 4×4 SRW with an 8-foot box and 3.55:1 rear axle. Towing 9,900 pounds isn’t much of a challenge for this configuration, which has a max conventional trailering capacity of 14,000 pounds and maximum fifth-wheel capacity of 15,700 pounds.

Tow/haul mode holds engine RPMs higher than usual before upshifting to help keep the truck from getting bogged down when it’s towing, and it automatically downshifts the truck with a tap of the foot brake, as long as it won’t take the engine over the rpm redline.

Selling more pickup F450 as better mileage, 3700 redline

remote start, Prescott AZ, Glendale, Phoenix  Ford is making it hard on the truck aftermarket. Factory gooseneck/5th wheels, factory trailer brake controller, remote diesel start and enough power, you may not need a chip.

Don Ufford

F450 Pickup, More Towing, Less Payload, More Speed

 

I don’t like blinkers and auto exhaust brake, but the general public will. I like control.

4 tranny modes, normal, tow, progressive, manual

tow haul downshift all the way from 6 to 1.

Exhuast reversed on c&C with DEF injector at the end

Chassis certifcation pickups

Dyno certification C&C 14k GVWR

take off shutter, bias to loaded or empty, Dana true track

Damper allows lower speed without shutter 950 rpm

F450 pickup, Dana 80, 4.30 axle, wide front axle, Reese plate, 8 bolt, 17″ wheels, 10 ply

F450 moved down from 14500 k gvwr to 13050, towing same, payload goes down  33k gcwr

Reese on F450 considered a cross member. early lock tc stays on longer tow haul mode, higher rpms lockup TC more and longer all the way down to 900 rpm

By dropping F450 GVWR below 14000, don’t have to detune for Dyno certification for EPA

Tradac label ,if you overstate your payload it’s a recallable item

nox trap cost of ownership Dodge

optimize combustion and cooling by doing the engine design inside for better mpg only one of the three that designs own diesel.

swirling in the exhaust

F550  300hp 660

True Trac Dana on DRW  Sterling E-lock Ford axle SRW  fronts are Dana

Upgraded pinion on SRW U-joints upgraded

New steering gear and geometry on 4×2

dyno certification pushes to urea

2013 sae standards truck designed to pass, continuous towing,

damper allows lugging  525 rpm  625 rpm

def 5.6, 6.3 cc  chris brewer

mike Harrison gas engine manager

pto from tc only in medium duty F650

F450 only 4×4  faster than 81 mph, 19.5 12 ply limited to 81, now Vmax 95  super dana 60, 172 wb

17″ max vehicle speed, improve mpg  24k towing  33 gcwr 4×4 only trailer rating went up 24,200 to 24,400

more of a F350 frame, s110 axle going, M80 axle  4.30 ratio Dana  frame 6.6 mm thick

s110 on 450/550 axle C&C

Ring and pinion larger for more diesel torque

steer arms are equal, transfer arm vrs, better response

exhaust brake automatic with tow mode, controlled by engine and tranny

exhaust brake will engage transmission mode independent steep down hill

high temp and low temp cooling system on diesel,

just high temp on gas

lower viscosity oil in engine and gas so warm up engine and tranny sooner for better mpg

def, tranny, engine less parasitic loses

geared higher, 3.55, 3.31 in F250 1600 at 70 mph hitting peak torque

6 head bolts per cylinder diesel, uniform clamp load

6.2L first gas engine to have the piston squirt

the 6.2-liter V-8 is shared with the F-150 SVT Raptor

same tranny, just less discs in

still two fuel filters

vehicle engineering manager Peter

less regens, 70% cleaner than 6.4L  twice as far for regen as 6.4L

upgraded diff 80 on DRW 10 3/4 pinion shaft bearings upgrade

Frank Davis  trucks boss

Don Upford 20 years

1000 lb payload running around

18 % diesel 15% gas better mpg

46% share of hd business

B20 E85

5.4L 385 300 405 360      6.4L 350 650

select shift progressive

vice grill, clamshell hood for room, new seats from F150 massive console flow thru are, 6 cupholders, I need them all, locking rear storage guns.

dash cluster screen 4.2″

hill climb assist 2 sec

prep package for Reese 5th wheel goose 24000 lb $400

81% 4×4

28 % off road course

side air bags, curtains standard 250-550 stability control standard

3 4 5 6 tc lockup, in tow mode locks all 6, manual mode locks all gears

1 plate tc closed tc piston, piston size different gas and diesel independent passage to lock TC

3 oil passes in tc shaft

output shaft larger than Allison, one piece case

transmission is competition for the Allison

variable overhead cam exhaust and intake

more hp that 6.8L less torque, but 6 gears lower first

composite intake 6.2L gas 3.73,19 k gcwr, 4.30 on gcwr 22k SRW or DRW

90 percent is available at 2,000 rpm.

18quarts transmission second loop for cooling oil to water instead of water to air

There’s a 3,000-pound spread between the maximum fifth-wheel towing amounts depending on the ratio. It’s 12,700 pounds with the 3.73 and 15,700 pounds with the 4.30.

reduce spin losses by warming oil

23 gram capacity tranny filter

selective catalytic reduction with DEF

The standard 2-valve 6.2-liter V-8 gas engine develops 385 horsepower (at 5,500 rpm) and 405 pounds-feet of torque (at 4,500 rpm), up from the old 5.4-liter gas V-8’s 300 hp and 365 pounds-feet.

Turbo is down in the valley, making it quieter with less vibration transfered to the frame

Ford seems to lower noise in the cab each model year.

There are all-new steering gears across the entire lineup of single- and dual-rear-wheel trucks to handle the heavier towing and hauling capabilities. More important, two-wheel drive trucks with Ford’s ancient twin I-beam front suspension have new parallel steering-rod linkages and steering geometry. The hydraulic steering pump keeps boost consistently high at low and high speeds, though its tuned to whether the truck has a gas or diesel engine.

steering helps with snow plows and over all long haul drive fatige

New ring and pinion in DRW

3.31 F250 diesel, finally, turbo lag is gone, we’ve been told this before

The outgoing 2010 Super Duty’s standard 5.4-liter gas V-8 is rated at 300 hp and 365 pounds-feet, and the optional 6.8-liter V-10 is rated at 362 hp and 457 pounds-feet. So the new 6.2-liter V-8 has more horsepower than either of the old engines and just misses splitting the difference in torque between the 5.4-liter and 6.8-liter, with two fewer cylinders than the massive 6.8-liter.

The old chassis-certified 6.4-liter Power Stroke diesel V-8 is rated at 350 hp and 650 pounds-feet, so we’re seeing a substantial jump in power by 40 horses and 85 pounds-feet from Ford’s in-house designed and built 6.7-liter V-8.

 

Glad to see the same transmission in gas and diesel, 6 gears, with a lower 1st gear at 3.97 gets the gas engine going with a trailer from the start smoothly. Nice spread of gears, same for diesel, instead of just a double overdrive for improved fuel mileage, Super Duty with the 6.2L gas engine actually can utilize all six gears, even direct is spaced more than 1 to 1. SRW only axle ration is the 3.73. Not the ratio we’re used to for towing 10,000 lb trailers. On the grade Ford provided us with 9000 lb. conventional trailer, the 6.2 L howls pulling a trailer near red line 6000  rpm. Without a trailer, the 6.2L has as nice low torquey throttle sound, but under load, the engine is louder in the cab than the new diesel engine.

Using the progressive shift option on the all new 6-speed 6R-140 automatic in tow mode, allows the driver to manage which gear holds the best RPM for proper torque range on the short stroke engine.  Not easy evaluating a gas engine right after flying up the hill with a diesel. The all new 6.2L gasser feels stronger than 5.4L gas engine it replaces, with some of the performance improvement credited to the new 6-speed automatic transmissions more efficient gear spacing.  6.2L throttle response is good with a trailer, but you know it’s not the 6.8L V-10 gas engine that’s still available with DRW cab and chassis but only with last years 5-speed 5R110 automatic transmission.

In Arizona towing a 9000 lb trailer with 3.73 rear axle ratio, close to 4500 ft elevation and side wind, not fast off the line but acceptable acceleration for uphill towing. Only other choice with a gas engine, is to go DRW and get the 4.30 axle ratio and be the first one to know really what gas mileage that combination will get.

Hydraulic damper  in tc

C&C DPF and DEF switched between pickup Chassis certification and C&C Dyno certification

 the hood barely holds all the radiator and this is the gas engine. The diesel has more cores and intercooler or low cooling.

 equalized steering arms on 4×2 with long steering stabilizer

 yellow plug at the bottom is the 1/4 turn oil drain. No drain plug, just stick the racket in the hole and turn.

 DEF injector

 auger, exhaust looks like a torpedo, gets exhaust treated, burned and swirled

 tranny filter, beefed up for 150k

 tranny filter

 Damper for TC

 Sophisticated variable cam 6.2L

 oil squirts under the piston skirts for cooling like diesels have for years

 dual spark plugs 6.2

 plastic intake, coils on top of inside plug with wire to outside plug

 love King Ranch large console, the cupholers come out just 4 leaves 2 and there’s a big storage place under there. Telescoping steering, lighter steering, more info in the dash readout, you have to look hard to find something you don’t like.

 left, brake controller, now for hydraulic trailer brakes, control center records facts for different trailers

 rear seat locking storage   

 new factory gooseneck ball

 trailer plug

 telescope

 big fuel door for diesel and urea

 Dodge got away from the round bolt on dually fender, so Ford picked it up

 turbine with the vanes is also the exhaust brake

 in the valley now exhaust manifold feeds the turbine vanes

 Where the air goes into the turbo, EGR on top going to intake, right is intercooler air coming in mixing with the EGR air

 Farther in the tube, the bottom is the first compressor wheel, the hole above feeds air to the second compressor wheel when the air volume is higher

 throttle with compress air mixing with recurculated exhaust air and going into the intake manifold which flows threw the heads to the outside manifold

 vacuum pump for SWR brake boost

 this cutout shows cam shaft, lifters, timing gears, injector pump, water pump and vacuum pump

 Outside intake in aluminum head

 F450, 8 bolt, 17″ wheels, what happened

 Cequent, Reese Signature, safety chains

 trailer readout

 On SRW button for E-Locker

 double walled exhaust pipe

 wastegate intake runners are above the turbo

 Back to the spin on 2 quart oil filter

 oil plug, it doesn’t come out, you just stick the ratchet in a twist a 1/4 turn

 Engine oil cooler, water to air

 TC clutch, damper

 live PTO gear, one when the engine is comes from the TC

 planetary, large output shaft

 Transmission cooler, air to water

 DEF warning

 Off roading

  cover, Ford visits SEMA

  new steering gears, long stabilizer shock

 DEF tank

 get you hand greasy unlatching the ball

NEW TORQSHIFT SIX-SPEED TRANSMISSION HARNESSES, CHANNELS INCREASED POWER FROM NEW FORD ENGINES

  • The new 6R140 heavy-duty TorqShift® six-speed automatic transmission is specifically designed to handle the increased torque produced by the all-new Ford-designed, Ford-engineered and Ford-built 6.7-liter Power Stroke® V-8 turbocharged diesel and also will be mated to the all-new 6.2-liter V-8 gasoline engine<
  • The new TorqShift transmission’s wider gear span, advanced controls that optimize the shift schedule, reduced parasitic friction losses and lower-rpm torque converter lockup all contribute to class-leading fuel economy in the 2011 Ford Super Duty
  • The new 6R140 transmission provides full SelectShift™ capability and is available with segment-exclusive Live Drive Power Take Off (PTO) with the new diesel engine

DEARBORN, Mich., Feb. 25, 2010 – All-new diesel and gasoline engines are key reasons why the 2011 Ford F-Series Super Duty maintains best-in-class towing and payload and adds enhanced off-road capability. Managing the best-in-class horsepower and torque is the all-new 6R140 heavy-duty TorqShift six-speed transmission, which delivers power quickly and seamlessly while maximizing fuel economy.

“Our new transmission perfectly complements our new diesel and gasoline engines to give the customer the best powertrain for Super Duty applications,” said Al Bruck,6R140 transmission engineering manager. “Rigorous testing ensures our transmission and powertrain is up to the challenge of even our most demanding Super Duty customers. Overall, the 6R140 heavy-duty TorqShift six-speed transmission enables greater customer capability, efficiency and control than ever before.”

Creating a transmission to serve both diesel and gasoline engines in a Super Duty application is a challenging proposition because the gearbox needs to deliver the substantial low-rpm torque produced by the diesel engine and efficiently use the higher rotational speeds of the gasoline engine. The solution was to use a proven architecture, but adapt it for heavy-duty use.

Lepelletier powerflow: New application of tried-and-true system
Ford’s 6R140 TorqShift transmission uses a Lepelletier-style powerflow, which is a proven technology in rear-wheel-drive vehicles but not typically used with larger diesel engines. A key benefit of the Lepelletier architecture is that it reduces the complexity in connecting the gearsets and clutches. The six speeds require only five clutches, and the speeds of the clutches relative to one another are low, increasing the efficiency of the system.

To handle the torque of the 6.7-liter Power Stroke V-8 turbocharged diesel, Ford strengthened the system by employing a unique powder-metal carrier in the compound Ravigneaux planetary gearset. The carrier consists of four pressed powder-metal components sinter-brazed together to forma rigid, power-dense structure. This solution ensures robustness and makes the architecture compatible with both the diesel and gasoline engines. A Ford-patented rocker one-way clutch is integrated with the carrier and helps improve 1-2 shift quality through the gearset.

“With this architecture, the new transmission can handle the enormous low-end torque produced by the new diesel engine as well as the high speeds produced by the new gas engine,” Bruck said. “The sinter-brazed gearset enables more torque capacity and greater engine speed capability.”

A deep first gear ratio and two overdrive gears create a wider ratio span. This, combined with available lower axle gear ratios and a control system that automatically selects the most efficient shift schedule, provides an outstanding combination of pulling power and fuel economy.

“Our first gear ratio is a fair amount deeper than our competitors, so customers will get improved off-the-line performance,” Bruck said. “The six ratios we’ve selected provide greater overall span and better overdrive performance, which reduces engine speed in highway conditions and improves fuel economy.

“Because we have six gears, we make smaller steps gear to gear, which helps keep the engine in its sweet spot in terms of performance and efficiency.”

Six-speed gearbox offers best of automatic, manual transmissions
The 6R140’s heavy-duty TorqShift six-speed transmission balances convenience and control by automatically shifting during routine operation and also allowing complete manual control. It features SelectShift Automatic transmission functionality, which includes both Progressive Range Select and manual functions.

With Progressive Range Select, a toggle on the shift lever allows the customer to reduce the range of available gears while in Drive. When the customer “taps” down into Range Select mode, the display shows the available gears and highlights the current gear state. This feature allows the driver to limit use of upper gears when heavily loaded or while towing on grades.

For full manual function, customers also can pull the shift lever into “M” for manual mode and use the same toggle switch to select the gear desired. The display will show the selected gear, and the control system will lock the torque converter and hold that gear for a full manual transmission feel.

Proven Tow Haul mode: Taken to the next level
The 6R140 transmission also features standard enhanced Tow Haul capability, which provides better control when hauling a heavy load or towing a trailer, especially when going down grades. The improved system uses an array of sophisticated electronic sensors to better predict the driver’s need for a downshift to provide engine braking and enhanced control.

Torque converter provides connected feel and better efficiency
The torque converter of the 6R140 transmission is designed to be accurately controlled and efficient. A closed-piston design provides precise control of the lock-up clutch. Its torque multiplication is matched with the rest of the powertrain for better off-the-line performance, but that’s only the start. Once under way, a long-travel, high-capacity turbine damper allows the torque converter to dampen out the extreme torsional force produced in particular by the new, more powerful diesel engine.

“This damper allows us to lug down to 900 rpm while our competitors lug to around 1,100 rpm,” Bruck said. “This technology allows us to stay locked more, which means the engine can run at a lower rpm and get better fuel economy.”

Live Drive PTO: Power whenever the engine is running
Another example of taking a proven technology and applying it to the Super Duty to improve customer productivity is the availability of segment-exclusive Live Drive PTO (Power Take Off). On 2011 Ford Super Duty diesels with the PTO prep option, the PTO output gear is linked through the torque converter to the engine crankshaft. This allows the transmission to power auxiliary equipment such as snowplows, aerial lifts, cement mixers, tow truck lifts or dump trucks. The power is available any time the engine is running.

Pioneered on agricultural applications, the Live Drive feature is particularly useful when mobile PTO function is required during start-stop operations, such as salt spreading or snow plowing. “A fully functional Live Drive mobile PTO will allow Super Duty customers to take full advantage of the equipment on their trucks,” said Bruck.

Durability testing in the lab and on the road
The 6R140 transmission has undergone extensive durability and reliability testing in Ford’s supercomputers, in the lab and on the road to ensure customer satisfaction. Extensive computer-aided engineering was completed before the hardware phase began for improved efficiency in terms of time and reduced failures.

Once the analysis was complete, physical testing in the laboratory included running the new transmission 24/7 while mated to both engines to help ensure real-world durability.

The transmission was rigorously tested – at unloaded and maximum GCW (Gross Combined Weight) duty cycles – for 250,000 equivalent miles to replicate what the most demanding, harshest Super Duty customer can dish out.

The 6R140 heavy-duty transmission will be built at the Sharonville (Ohio) Transmission Plant.

ALL-NEW FORD-ENGINEERED, FORD-TESTED, FORD-BUILT DIESEL MAXIMIZES 2011 SUPER DUTY’S PRODUCTIVITY

  • The all-new Ford-engineered, Ford-designed, Ford-built 6.7-liter Power Stroke® V-8 turbocharged diesel engine has best-in-class torque of  735 ft.-lb. (at 1,600 rpm) and best-in-class 390 horsepower (at 2,800 rpm) – 85 ft.-lb. and 40 horsepower more than the outgoing product – with best-in-class fuel economy; new engine is B20 biodiesel compatible as well
  • Extensive durability testing put the new Power Stroke diesel engine through the equivalent of 250,000 miles
  • Turbocharger with industry-first dual-sided compressor wheel delivers fast throttle response along with the volume of air boost needed for maximum power; new engine helps enable best-in-class towing capability of 24,400 pounds

DEARBORN, Mich., Feb. 25, 2010 – A new era in Ford diesel technology arrives with the Ford-engineered, Ford-tested and Ford-manufactured 6.7-liter Power Stroke® V-8 turbocharged diesel engine.

Debuting in the 2011 Ford F-Series Super Duty truck, the new diesel engine delivers best-in-class 735 ft.-lb. of torque (at 1,600 rpm), 390 horsepower (at 2,800 rpm) and class-leading fuel economy while adding more fueling flexibility and easily meeting stringent new emissions requirements.

The new 6.7-liter diesel engine also shares the Super Duty’s legendary reliability and durability while enabling best-in-class towing capability of 24,400 pounds.

“This all-new diesel engine has been so extensively tested both in the lab and in the real world that we’re confident we’re giving our customers the most reliable and productive powertrain available today,” said Derrick Kuzak, group vice president, Ford Global Product Development.  “Our Super Duty customers demand reliability and durability in their trucks so they can deliver the best results for their business and their customers. That’s exactly what this engine delivers.”

The diesel engine team made improvements and changes throughout the engine architecture to deliver on aggressive horsepower, torque, emissions and fuel economy targets. The 6.7-liter Power Stroke uses an “inboard exhaust” architecture, an automotive-industry first for a modern production diesel engine. It combines the best of proven technology with new, patented approaches backed by an extensive laboratory and real-world testing regimen to assure customer satisfaction.

Benefits of the new 6.7-liter Power Stroke V-8 turbocharged diesel engine include:

  • First use of a compacted graphite iron (CGI) engine block in a Super Duty-class vehicle in North America; stronger than cast iron, Ford has successfully used CGI in engine blocks in products around the world. The block structure was optimized for reduced weight and maximum strength to meet the demands of higher torque and horsepower.
  • Unique inboard exhaust and outboard intake architecture, an automotive-industry first for a modern production diesel engine, reduces overall exhaust system volume, which leads to better throttle response for the customer; additionally, reduced exhaust system surface area minimizes heat transfer to the engine compartment and improves NVH (noise, vibration, harshness) performance.
  • The new engine architecture enables easier service work for all major engine components, potentially reducing downtime. On turbocharger service, for example, the body/cab no longer has to be removed from the frame to access the turbo; also, the high-pressure fuel pump, EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) components and thermostats are directly accessible from the front of the vehicle.
  • Honeywell’s VNT™ (variable nozzle turbine) DualBoost turbocharger features an industry-first dual-sided compressor wheel that works in a single housing. The unit is uniquely center-mounted on a pedestal low in the back of the valley for improved NVH.  This turbocharger design allows the single unit to deliver the benefits of a twin-turbocharger system in a smaller, more efficient package, combining the advantages of a small turbocharger (faster response) and a large turbocharger (ability to compress and force more air into the engine for more power) in one unit.
  • The high-pressure Bosch fuel system injects fuel at more than 29,000 psi. The system delivers up to five injection events per cylinder per cycle using eight-hole piezo injectors to spray fuel into the piston bowl. The direct-injection system is calibrated and phased for optimum power, fuel efficiency and NVH performance.
  • Aluminum cylinder heads for reduced weight; the mid-deck construction with dual water jackets provides increased strength and optimal cooling; also, six head bolts, instead of four as found on other engines, help improve sealing and maintain cylinder integrity even with the higher firing pressures; overall the engine is about 160 pounds lighter.
  • Compatible up to B20 fuel, allowing greener fueling options of up to 20 percent biodiesel and 80 percent petroleum diesel.

“Our Super Duty customers are no-nonsense, no-compromise individuals,” said Barb Samardzich, Ford vice president, Global Powertrain Engineering. “Those a

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